alexchiri

2 minute read

I was reading the other day in some blinks (summaries of non-fiction books) from The Shallows, the following:

<code>Trying to juggle so much stimulus at once results in a loss of concentration, and makes it nearly impossible to read and extract information from long online texts. In fact, one experiment has shown that the more links a text includes, the less information participants could comprehend and remember after reading it.
</code>

And then I thought of my 7 habits article that I wrote a month or so ago, it has 21 (twenty one) links. If you would click all these links while reading (and you should, otherwise why would they be there?), you’d probably end up not remembering much. So I decided to remove the links from the text, and move them at the bottom of the article. From now on, I will display words that might need more details in italics and put those details in the footer of the article.

In the end, I don’t want to confuse even more the 2 confused readers I have on this blog, one of which is me.


blinks: pages of non-fiction book summaries from blinkist are called blinks. Brilliant service they have, very useful for the idea hungry The Shallows: book by Nicholas Carr 7 habits article: after reading The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen Covey, I decided to write an article with the main ideas of the book. It ended up quite long.

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